Missouri Main Street holds training session for CHD-CPI

Keith Winge, left, holds a training seminar on developing a successful and sustainable community development and historic district preservation organization. More than a dozen involved with CHD and CPI were present for the session. Winge is Community Development Coordinator of MMSC.

Keith Winge, left, holds a training seminar on developing a successful and sustainable community development and historic district preservation organization. More than a dozen involved with CHD and CPI were present for the session. Winge is Community Development Coordinator of MMSC. Photo by David Wilson.

Keith Winge, Community Development Coordinator of Missouri Main Street Connection (MMSC), presented an information and fundraiser training session for those involved in the California Historic District (CHD) and California Progress, Inc. (CPI) Wednesday, May 28. The event was held at the Moniteau County Historical Society Building on North High Street.

CHD, which falls under the umbrella of CPI, is one of eight current affiliate grant communities of MMSC. There are seven communities which have recently completed the program. Winge presented an overview of the MMSC, spoke of the best funding models, discussed events and other fundraising means and the development of work plans. He also spoke about the makeup and duties of the four committees - Organization, Promotion, Design and Economic Restructuring. He also discussed the role and responsibilities of the board of directors.

MMSC takes a comprehensive approach to community development and historic preservation, with consideration for the physical, economic, social and civic parts of the community. The historic business districts are promoted by understanding how markets have changed, identification of assets in the area to be developed and preserved, defining the district’s market position and creating new activities to fit within the district and it market.

Winge pointed out the “Facts of Life” regarding revitalization of an historic district. The first point he made is that there is no magic bullet for the revitalization effort. In fact, each community is different and what works in one may not work in another. He also pointed out that most of the resources are local, and that some changes will be needed. Those present were reminded that they can’t do the revitalization alone and it won’t happen overnight. Above all, he said the process is never finished.

The successful formula for funding a sustainable community revitalization program involves four funding sources - 30 percent from outside private sector entities, 30 percent from inside private sector entities, 30 percent from public sector funds and 10 percent from events, festivals and such. Winge went on to explain some of the sources in each category.

As far as fundraising events are concerned, Winge said sponsors should be sought for any events planned. Event sponsors help assure that if the event doesn’t come off well, for instance because of weather, it can still be a break-even event rather than a loss. Also addressed at the session was the topic of individual fundraising efforts. One proposed exercise was the idea of a board member and a volunteer to make a list of individuals or businesses which could be approached to ask for an investment in the California Historic District, ranging from $25 to $1,000.

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