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Three local education projects get a boost

Three local education projects get a boost

November 14th, 2018 by Liz Morales, emorales@californiademocrat.com in Local News

Sonic Drive-In has completed its 10th annual fall voting campaign for Limeades for Learning. This time, donations went straight to California School District classrooms, as well as to High Point Elementary School.

Limeades for Learning is a program that was set in place for teachers across the nation to submit project requests to donorschoose.org for classroom resources that are needed to build a better learning environment for students.

This time around, two teachers from CHS brought in a portion of the $1 million donation from Sonic. The total for the local projects was $1,094.99 and went to Janet Henley and Jamie Johnston.

Henley's project was "Books that Students will Actually WANT to Read," and Johnston's was "Shedding Light on Science."

This sizable donation will be used to bring a variety of learning materials to their classrooms.

High Point Elementary School received a total donation of $593.59.

The fall voting campaign was Oct. 1-28 and was available for Sonic voters to cast their ballots daily for inspiring teacher projects. Each week, teacher projects that earned the most votes received a chunk of Sonic's one million dollar donation.

These projects range from materials such as book, flexible seating, art supplies, robotics kits and even Chromebooks.

Over the ten years, Sonic has donated $11.7 million to public school teachers all across the nation to assist in funding learning materials.

The materials in question come from donorschoose.org. The foundation began in 2000 by a Bronx history teacher and has since then raised upwards of $740 million for America's learning environments. It is the only program that carefully vets each request for donation, delivers materials directly to schools, takes pictures of every funded project, and writes a cost report to show how each penny was spent.