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Detentions spike, border arrests fall in Trump's first year

Detentions spike, border arrests fall in Trump's first year

December 6th, 2017 by Associated Press in National News

FILE - In this March 6, 2015, file photo, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents enter an apartment complex looking for a specific undocumented immigrant convicted of a felony during an early morning operation in Dallas. The federal government provided Tuesday, Dec. 5, 2017, the most complete statistical snapshot of immigration enforcement under President Donald Trump, showing Border Patrol arrests plunged to a 45-year low while arrests by deportation officers soared. (AP Photo/LM Otero, File)

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's immigration crackdown has produced a spike in detentions by deportation officers across the country during his first months in office. At the same time, arrests along the Mexican border have fallen sharply, apparently as fewer people have tried to sneak into the U.S.

Figures released by the Department of Homeland Security show Trump is delivering on his pledge to more strictly control immigration and suggest that would-be immigrants are getting the message to not even think about crossing the border illegally.

Even as border crossings decline, however, Trump continues to push for his promised wall along the border — a wall that critics say is unnecessary and a waste of cash.

The new numbers, which offer the most complete snapshot yet of immigration enforcement under Trump, show that Border Patrol arrests plunged to a 45-year low in the fiscal year that ended Sept. 30, with fewer people being apprehended between official border crossings.

In all, the Border Patrol made 310,531 arrests in fiscal 2016, down 25 percent from a year earlier and the lowest level since 1971.

Officials have credited that drop to Trump's harsh anti-immigration rhetoric and policies, including widely publicized arrests of immigrants living in the U.S. illegally.

"There's a new recognition by would-be immigrants that the U.S. is not hanging up a welcome sign," said Michelle Mittelstadt, of non-partisan Migration Policy Institute. She pointed to Trump's rhetoric, as well as his policies. "I think there's a sense that the U.S. is less hospitable."

But Mittelstadt also stressed that the numbers are part of a larger trend that began well before Trump's inauguration: Mexico's improving economy and more opportunities at home have stemmed the tide of people flowing across the border for work.

"You've really had a realignment in migration from Mexico," she said, noting that the numbers of Mexicans apprehended in 2017 fell by 34 percent from the previous year.

The decline in border crossings continues a trend that began during the Obama administration, and marks a dramatic drop from 2000, when more than 1.6 million people were apprehended crossing the border alone.

Overall, deportations over the last year dropped about 6 percent from the previous year — a number tied to the sharp decline in border crossings as well as a backlog in the immigration courts that process deportations, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement said.

But that number masks a striking uptick in arrests away from the border. Those arrests have sparked fear and anger in immigrant communities, where many worry the government is now targeting them.

ICE said the number of "interior removals" — people who are apprehended away from the border — jumped 25 percent this year to 81,603. And the increase is 37 percent after Trump's inauguration compared to the same period the year before.

"The president made it clear in his executive orders: There's no population off the table," Thomas Homan, ICE's acting director, told reporters in Washington, Tuesday. "If you're in this country illegally, we're looking for you and we're going to look to apprehend you."